Here's How the Military Community Stepped Up After the Shooting

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Chief Religious Programs Specialist Ana Douglas, attached to U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), attends a candlelight vigil in Yokosuka, Japan, in observance of Suicide Prevention month on Sept. 27, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Semales)
Chief Religious Programs Specialist Ana Douglas, attached to U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), attends a candlelight vigil in Yokosuka, Japan, in observance of Suicide Prevention month on Sept. 27, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Semales)

It was the prophetic Mr. Rogers who once said that in the darkest of times, to look for the helpers. Staff of OneBlood blood bank in Pensacola, Florida didn't have to look far, as their doors were overwhelmed with those wanting to help.

Following a deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola, in which seven were injured, three were killed and the shooter also died, folks turned to OneBlood, wanting to do something -- anything -- to help their friends, brothers and sisters in arms and colleagues.

In a now viral Facebook post, a woman who was at the blood bank shared her touching experience of a community coming together in the darkness to find any glimmer of light: pilots willing to work the desk to alleviate duties of the overburdened staff, donors willing to drive bags of blood to their buddies in the hospital, and more than anything, people showing up.

With two shootings in two days, these times do feel particularly dark. We are the light, my friends. Keep shining.

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