VA Seeking Input on FSGLI Coverage for Stillborn Children

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Stuffed tiger perched in a baby’s crib. (congerdesign/Pixabay)
Stuffed tiger perched in a baby’s crib. (congerdesign/Pixabay)

The Department of Veterans Affairs is seeking the public's input on Family Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (FSGLI) coverage of stillborn children.

FSGLI is a life insurance program for spouses and dependent children of military members insured under SGLI. By law, children are automatically covered under the program with $10,000 of life insurance at no cost, and coverage begins either on the date of birth or on the date a child becomes a legal dependent.

Public Law 110-389, the Veterans' Benefits Improvement Act of 2008, expanded the definition of "insurable dependent" for SGLI purposes to include a member's stillborn child.

The current definition of a "member's stillborn child" is that a fetus must weigh at least 350 grams or, if the fetal weight is unknown, the duration in utero is at least 20 completed weeks of gestation.

The VA is proposing to amend that definition to allow reliance upon the fetus' gestational age even if the fetus' weight is known. As a result, a fetus whose duration in utero is 20 completed weeks of gestation but which weighs less than 350 grams would qualify as a "member's stillborn child."

The department is seeking the public's input on this change to regulations. You can submit written comments to:

Director
Office of Regulation Policy and Management (00REG)
Department of Veterans Affairs
810 Vermont Ave NW
Room 1064
Washington, DC 20420

You can also submit comments online at regulations.gov.

Comments should indicate that they are submitted in response to "RIN 2900-AQ49-Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance, Definition of Stillborn Child."

Comments must be received by Aug. 26, 2019.

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