Americans Really Like Vets and Think Businesses Ought to Hire More of Them, Poll Finds

Marines, veterans and spouses get face-to-face with employers during the Marine Corps Air Station New River job fair, Sept. 5, 2013. (U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Martin Egnash)
Marines, veterans and spouses get face-to-face with employers during the Marine Corps Air Station New River job fair, Sept. 5, 2013. (U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Martin Egnash)

A new poll found that the high regard and trust Americans gave to veterans after the 9/11 terror attacks hasn't worn off, even after nearly 18 years of war.

A great majority still believes that the term "hero" describes post-9/11 veterans -- 81 points on a 100-point scale -- according to a July survey by the Ipsos global market research and consulting firm.

About 78% of respondents rate veterans as "valuable community assets" with a "strong work ethic" who should be afforded more opportunities for employment in their transition to the civilian workforce, the poll found.

About 75% agreed that veterans come to the job market with unique skill sets; 75% also agreed that veterans would be a valuable asset to any firm willing to hire them, the poll found.

Despite the positives, a majority of Americans -- 62% -- believes that post-9/11 veterans may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, according to the survey.

In addition, respondents who described themselves as either self-employed or working as a paid employee were asked whether they knew of any programs to promote the hiring of veterans. Only 13% said "yes."

When the same question was asked of the same group in reference to military spouses, only 6% said "yes."

The survey was conducted July 12-15 and consisted of interviews with 1,018 adults over the age of 18, Ipsos said.

Among the findings: 79% agreed that businesses should do more to support veterans in their transition to the civilian workforce, and 64% agreed that veterans should have priority in hiring.

About 68% agreed that businesses should do more to support military spouses who already work for them, the survey showed.

-- Richard Sisk can be reached at Richard.Sisk@Military.com.

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